Category Archives: Butterfly watching

A butterfly park at the end of the world

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There were many informational signs up in the garden at one time. This was the only one I could find on my last visit.

In the heart of my city Pune, unnoticed by many, butterflies congregate in a rundown little municipal garden. Like all things created by the city, the garden in Sahakar Nagar, fronted by bright green butterfly-wing gates announcing its purpose as an insect house, has fallen into disrepair. No one among the powers-that-be, focused narrowly on business opportunities, is interested in keeping a green idea going. Last month when we visited the garden, we found it had the appearance of a lost world Arthur Conan Doyle or Indiana Jones would likely visit. The nurturing net enclosures where caterpillars were supposed to be reared were all in tatters, and the garden itself was completely overgrown with butterfly-loving lantana and towering milkweed. Overgrowth doesn’t bother the flying insects, in fact they seemed happier and buzzier as there were more places to hide in the towering bushes. But a human gardener, though pleased on behalf of the arriving lepidopterans, can only feel a sense of impending doom. Overgrowth in a public garden is a sign that all is not well. Decay attracts busy politicians who will want to use this neglect as an excuse to make it over, not with new plantings, but suffocating concrete.

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Randomly cut overgrowth with a couple of common sailors flying around in the sun as foreground attractions.
A closer look at the common sailor.
A closer look at the common sailor.

The paths remained walkable, but just about. A man—his hair plastered over with cooling henna paste—and a woman, we assumed to be caretakers told us the city was planning to build a planetarium at the site. Being a star geek, I am all for planetariums, except when municipal authorities decide to put it up on land meant for butterfly and bird inhabitants. Pune is all weedy concrete jungle and relentless eroding cement dust now, its trees are fast disappearing, chopped down to make way for unplanned buildings and wider roads. As for birds and butterflies, the businessmen politicians are not interested in their welfare or in the fragile eco-system of the hills surrounding the city. They are in fact, looking for ways, to pull back existing laws meant to protect the bio-diverse hills, as the fastest way to make a buck through their builder friends who will pour their favourite cement mix all over the city’s hill lungs.

A common rose taking full advantage of the overgrowth, its striking vivid reds playing hard to get with my camera lens
A common rose taking full advantage of the overgrowth, its striking vivid reds playing hard to get with my camera lens.
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Inside one of the tattered enclosures was what I think is a glassy tiger feeding away quietly not too bothered by my heavy footfalls.

I could be guilty of romanticising our problems. Once there were green spaces in the heart of the city where mostly the upper castes and the rich lived in beautiful bungalows with attached gardens. Now this is being replaced with terribly ugly, clustering, crowded overpriced flats in multi-storied buildings with basement parking and no verges or gardens. After the last few gardens vanish, where will the butterflies go? They will disperse through the city into its remaining dust-caked trees and weeds sprouting through cracks in the urban sprawl. I see some of them everyday scurrying through traffic in between the marauding hordes of automatic scooters, taking shelter at dusk in stairwells alongside distant moth relatives. Their fate is our fate. This is no country for butterflies.

A common evening brown taking shelter in our building's stairwell. This is the butterfly I see flitting gamely between scooters on our fast roads.
A common evening brown taking shelter in our building’s stairwell. This one is brilliantly camouflaged when it comes to rest on a forest floor carpeted by fallen brown leaves. This is the butterfly I see flitting gamely between scooters on our fast roads.
Here is a common rose, my lens not doing justice to its beauty, feeding on a butterfly favourite 'lantana'.  If you are lucky enough to have a garden, please do plant flowers that butterflies love.
Here is a common rose, my lens not doing justice to its beauty, feeding on a butterfly favourite ‘lantana’. If you are lucky enough to have a garden, please do plant flowers that butterflies love.
I couldn't find this sign on my last visit. But here is a picture from one of my previous visits. A list of some plants popular with our flying jewels.
I couldn’t find this sign on my last visit. But here is a picture from one of my previous visits. A list of some plants popular with our flying jewels.
Most probably a common emigrant butterfly identifiable because of this lovely lime green. Here it is feeding on another butterfly favourite Asclepius or butterfly weed.
Most probably a common emigrant butterfly identifiable because of this lovely lime green. Here it is feeding on another butterfly favourite Asclepias or butterfly weed or blood flower.
A common rose feeding on a Jamaican Bluespike. If you  are interested in Indian wildflowers, please get Common Indian Wildflowers by Isaac Kehimkar. He has also written The Book of Indian Butterflies.
A common rose feeding on a Jamaican Bluespike. If you are interested in Indian wildflowers, please get Common Indian Wildflowers by Isaac Kehimkar. He has also written The Book of Indian Butterflies.
A very common but vividly blue milkweed butterfly _ introducing the blue tiger. They are very common, but I can never get enough of them.
A sky-blue-striped milkweed butterfly _ introducing the blue tiger. They are very common, but I can never get enough of them.
A rare surprise visit from a blue pansy on my fifth floor balcony. Just look at those soul blues, how can we not make space for them in our  cities?
A rare surprise visit from a blue pansy to my fifth floor balcony. Just look at those soul blues, how can we not make space for them in our cities?
And finally, Tips from an old sign in the soon to vanish butterfly garden in Pune...
And finally,
Tips from an old sign in the butterfly garden ‘Papillon’ in Pune. The butterfly featured in the upper left hand corner of this sign is the gorgeous tawny coster. Please do save this garden if you can…